Why have I not posted for 6 months? New job in the IT department at the British Petroleum refinery in Blaine, WA and my senior year of school online at WGU for my Bachelor’s in IT Security – which includes gems like this:

The elements on a form need to be initialized with dates for the next week, starting from today. Only the <input> tags of type text need to be initialized. Consider the following XHTML code:

<head>
<script type=”text/javascript”>
function FillDate() {
var d = new Date();
// insert loop here
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<form name=”calendarForm”>
<input type=”text” name=”date1″></input><br/>
<input type=”text” name=”date2″></input><br/>
<input type=”text” name=”date3″></input><br/>
<input type=”text” name=”date4″></input><br/>
<input type=”text” name=”date5″></input><br/>
<input type=”text” name=”date6″></input><br/>
<input type=”text” name=”date7″></input><br/>
<input type=”button” name=”fillDates” onclick=”FillDate()” value=”Fill Days”></input>
</form>
</body>

Given the code, which loop will accomplish this?
and this answer they want is this:

for (var i = 0; i < document.calendarForm.length; i++) {
if (document.calendarForm.elements.type == “text”) {
d.setDate(d.getDate() + 1);
document.calendarForm.elements.value = d.toDateString();
}
}

Line by line, what is this for loop doing? it looks to me like it’s checking to see if it’s a text box, and if it is it’s going to set the new date to whatever date it gets + 1 to what? the day? and I’m lost after that.

 I had the same problem. The answer says:

This answer uses the correct way to get the number of elements in the form via the length property.   How many elements?  7. That means 7 loops

To determine the element type, it uses the type attribute.  It is looking for the tag type=”text”

The next date is correctly calculated by adding one to the day number obtained with getDate and then setDate is used to get the date element.

 

This is where it gets tricky   – d.setDate(d.getDate() + 1); —– remember it does the thing inside the parentheses first. 

getDate gets the actual number date 1-31 from the computer the script is running on, adds one (1) to it, and puts that new number in variable “d”

setDate runs next and sets the day of the month in the Date object to our new number in “d”.

 Finally, the new date is assigned to the value property — one point that is NOT in the CIW text -“toDateString”

document.calendarForm.elements[i].value = d.toDateString();

In each time around the loop the new value of  the “d” variable is turned into a string with the format “Day mon date(this is a number 1-31) year”. This string is now the system date of the computer running the script PLUS 1 for each time through the loop. Literally it returns “day mon “d” year”

BONUS POINTS – THE DATE WILL ALWAYS START WITH “TOMORROW” BECAUSE d.setDate(d.getDate() + 1); ADDS ONE TO THE WHOLE MESS THE FIRST TIME THROUGH AND THE DATE BECOMES TODAY + ONE.

Kindle Prime – Not so much…

I have been a big fan of the Amazon Kindle since I got my first one several Christmases ago from my beautiful significant other. The experience has evolved onto Kindle for the PC, an Android tablet, an Android phone and now the Kindle Fire HD my wonderful, beautiful significant other totally surprised me with on Christmas day. The hardware is great, even if the software is a little limited by Amazon’s version of the iPad – designed to sell you Amazon, rather than iTunes, content. Love it – especially the high definition video capability that will be pumping out free on-line video content to our HD bigscreen as soon as I get the cable for it.

The purchase comes with a free month trial of Kindle Prime. This is promoted as being the best thing ever, and I even considered spending the $79 for a full year, until I used it for a few weeks. What do you get for your money? Ok, a lot video – movies and shows – that rivals Netflix or paid Hulu – but I already have access to Netflix and Xfinity and rarely use them personally. I read. A lot. A book a week or more since I was 3 years old. Prime touts their “Free Lending Library for Prime Members Only!” – which means you can borrow “Unlimited!” books through your Kindle. Yayyy! You get one book a month. I already read my book for January. Now what?

The final part of the Prime super Hype is “Free 2 Day Shipping On All Amazon Orders” – Yaaaayyy!!! I ordered a cover for my Kindle Fire HD from them on December 30th – received it on January 6th, about the same as if I ordered it normally. Yes it went out 2 day, but it did not speed up the fulfillment process and I still had that feeling of looking for something in the mailbox for more days than expected.

So – don’t get me wrong, I love my Kindle and all the great deals on cool stuff and books on Amazon. They sent a 40% off voucher for Kindle accessories and I got an awesome Marware cover/case for it at HALF the price of the same thing at Best Buy. They gave me a $2 voucher for apps and a $3 dollar voucher for music, all included with the Kindle purchase. I just will not be renewing my Prime Membership. Ever.

Review Your PayPal Account Today

Paypal Scam Alert!! Just going through my email and had one that claims to be from Paypal – “Review Your PayPal Account Today” – it is a scam email that links to a different website that looks just like Paypal. DO NOT ENTER YOUR INFORMATION – you will be giving your info to a scammer who will drain your paypal and any credit attached to it. Years ago we fell for one of these and they bought 2 expensive computer displays somewhere in Eastern Europe for about $1500. Luckily only had to eat the $50 max on the credit card. BEWARE – THIS IS A PRETTY GOOD FORGERY!!!

Scareware Scammer Hit With 163 Million Fine – Infopackets.com

Scareware Scammer Hit With 163 Million Fine Infopackets.com.
Finally! I don’t know how many computers – customers, friends and family – that I have removed this stuff from. Hard to remove, annoying and scary for end users.

Microsoft, Adobe Fix Critical Security Flaws / Infopackets.com

Microsoft, Adobe Fix Critical Security Flaws / Infopackets.com.

Here is another important update to be sure to apply. Several of these are designated as ‘critical’ and that means hackers are looking for these holes to get in through. If you have automatic updates set up (all my customers do) you do not have to worry. If not HERE is a link on how to do it. These type of critical updates create Zero Day situations for hackers – meaning they look at the update and reverse engineer it to see what the hole was. Then they go out on the Internet looking for computers that have not updated. UPDATE NOW!

The Layman’s Guide to Solving Wireless Network Interference Problems | 7 Tutorials

The Layman’s Guide to Solving Wireless Network Interference Problems | 7 Tutorials.

This article is a great reference and the program mentioned (inSSIDer) is the same one I use to troubleshoot my own and client’s wireless environments.

Password Reuse – Hack my accounts!

Password Reuse - Hack my accounts!

Reusing passwords is what allows hackers to get first to your email account, then Amazon and then your credit cards.

Children warned name of first pet should contain 8 characters and a digit | NewsBiscuit

Children warned name of first pet should contain 8 characters and a digit | NewsBiscuit.

FBI — Check to See if Your Computer is Using Rogue DNS

FBI — Check to See if Your Computer is Using Rogue DNS.

Takes just a few seconds to get your ip address and check it.

From the FBI site:

DNS (Domain Name System) is an Internet service that converts user-friendly domain

names into the numerical Internet protocol (IP) addresses that computers use to talk to

each other. When you enter a domain name, such as http://www.fbi.gov, in your web browser

address bar, your computer contacts DNS servers to determine the IP address for the

website. Your computer then uses this IP address to locate and connect to the website. DNS

servers are operated by your Internet service provider (ISP) and are included in your

computer’s network configuration. DNS and DNS Servers are a critical component of your

computer’s operating environment—without them, you would not be able to access

websites, send e-mail, or use any other Internet services.

Criminals have learned that if they can control a user’s DNS servers, they can control what

sites the user connects to on the Internet. By controlling DNS, a criminal can get an

unsuspecting user to connect to a fraudulent website or to interfere with that user’s online

web browsing. One way criminals do this is by infecting computers with a class of malicious

software (malware) called DNSChanger. In this scenario, the criminal uses the malware to

change the user’s DNS server settings to replace the ISP’s good DNS servers with bad DNS

servers operated by the criminal. A bad DNS server operated by a criminal is referred to as

a rogue DNS server.

The FBI has uncovered a network of rogue DNS servers and has taken steps to disable it.

The FBI is also undertaking an effort to identify and notify victims who have been impacted

by the DNSChanger malware. One consequence of disabling the rogue DNS network is that

victims who rely on the rogue DNS network for DNS service could lose access to DNS

services. To address this, the FBI has worked with private sector technical experts to

develop a plan for a private-sector, non-government entity to operate and maintain clean

DNS servers for the infected victims. The FBI has also provided information to ISPs that can

be used to redirect their users from the rogue DNS servers to the ISPs’ own legitimate

servers. The FBI will support the operation of the clean DNS servers for four months,

allowing time for users, businesses, and other entities to identify and fix infected

computers. At no time will the FBI have access to any data concerning the Internet activity

of the victims.

It is quite possible that computers infected with this malware may also be infected with

other malware. The establishment of these clean DNS servers does not guarantee that the

computers are safe from other malware. The main intent is to ensure users do not lose DNS

services.

My feed to LinkedIn and FB has strange characters « WordPress.com Forums

My feed to LinkedIn and FB has strange characters « WordPress.com Forums.

Had to unlink Facebook and LinkedIn because my posts on edscomputerservices.wordpress.com are garbled when they automatically post to those sites.

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